Websites are launched by a gazillion website development companies every second. However, you visit only those that appeal to you functionally and aesthetically. Now, this preference is a function of several parameters, of which 10 are listed below.

1. The website resonates with you – the target audience
A quality website speaks to you in your language. The most successful websites stay away from corporate gobbledygook, and eliminate the fluff like it was plague.

2. It communicates a compelling value proposition
When you arrive on a website, its homepage should compel you to stick around. It’s the best place that a business can make an impression on you with its value proposition so that you don’t ditch it for its competitor’s website. All web design companies should take note of this.

3. Optimised for mobile devices
User centered design is not just a buzzword. It is meant to be practiced. And if you are someone from a web application development agency reading this article, make it a point to constantly remind your team members from here on that almost every Internet user accesses the web from a mobile phone. (there are currently close to 730 million mobile phone users). Moreover, there shouldn’t be ‘flashy’ objects like flash banners, animations, pop-ups or overly complicated elements that obtrude browsing. Less or no dependency on flash objects is a sign of good design thinking.

4. It has clearly defined calls-to-action
The purpose of each page in a website is to get you to navigate through the website and move you further down the funnel. The most usable websites use primary and secondary calls-to-action to direct you to the next logical step. CTAs tell you what to do next so that you don't get overwhelmed or lost. Which is why writers in UX/UI agencies spend time in crafting the most effective CTAs.

5. Answers ‘Who I am’, ‘What I do’, ‘What can you (the visitor) do here’
A well-known brand or company can get away with not having to describe who it is and what it does. This is solid branding identification But the reality is that most businesses need to answer these questions so that visitors know that they are in the right place. In his book, Don't Make Me Think, author Steve Krugg clearly states that if visitors can't identify what a business does within seconds, they won't stick around long.

6. Comes with a clear identity
Pay close attention the next time you’re surfing the Internet. Watch for sites with logos or titles that are obscure, or a design so cluttered with ads and banners that the pertinent information gets lost. A good website always keeps its identity visible. And it’s also brief and concise with its text.

7. Has good navigation
What is GPS to mobile phones, navigation is to a website. Just as homes are easier to find with a good map, web content is easier to find with good navigation. If a website doesn’t have it, its competition likely will.

8. Hosts only good content
Good not only means interesting, but also accurate, fresh and well-communicated. Remember, you like everyone else have a short attention span. Hence, a quality website will keep its content clear and succinct, use proper grammar, spell words correctly, will be accurate, relevant, and up-to-date. A good website will also have an up-to-date blog and social media handles – a good go to market strategy.

9. Is secure
A robust website will urge you to use strong passwords for your accounts. Also, if the site is built on a platform like WordPress or Magento, timely updates will help it function better. These periodic updates often address security issues found by other users and developers.

10. It has testimonials
A sincere website will always establish its credibility with the help of testimonials. In today’s social world, shoppers increasingly rely on the feedback of others, even if they’ve never met them. Testimonials from a client or customer feel more genuine than sales copy written by the website owner.

Author's Bio: 

We bring a different world-view and operate at the cusp of management consulting and design thinking to dycode cultural insights, dysrupt categories and markets, and dysign solutions for radical impact.