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ADHD NEWSLETTER from Patrick J. Hurley
www.addcorridorcoaching.com

ADHD – Mood Swings and Anxiety
July 2004 Volume I Issue VII

Statement: My intent in this newsletter is to express as quickly as possible my own beliefs and opinions on matters. I have no problems with people who disagree with my opinion and have even been swayed to rethink my position from time to time.

I wanted to let you know that our book many years in the making is still nearing completion, it is authored by me and Robert Eme Ph.D. and will be titled ADHD and the Criminal Justice System-“Spinning out of control”. I am actually sending this newsletter out from N. Charleston S.C. where I am meeting with the publisher today. The book is designed for the police, jails, judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, probation, prisons, halfway houses and parole officials. To learn more and get updates click here. http://www.addcorridorcoaching.com/book.asp
Robert Eme’s e-mail is reme@argosyu.edu

NEWSLETTER
Many persons with ADHD (myself included) even though on medication may continue to experience unexplained mood changes or anxiety at times. The reasons for these changes are usually as mysterious in their coming as in their going.

For me a perfectly normal day may be interrupted by a feeling of anxiousness, fidgetiness, restlessness, a down mood swing or what my wife likes to call the
“heebie jeebies”. Later in the day my mood may improve as suddenly as it had deteriorated earlier that day. Some other days I may feel in a good mood or upbeat for no particular reason. It has never been suggested to me and I don’t believe I have bipolar disorder although I do know some people with ADHD that are bipolar as well.

These changes in moods and anxiety have been with me my entire life. I must say that they have lessened considerably since I started on my medication 8 years ago. Unfortunately they have not been entirely eliminated.

In talking to others with ADHD I have found that many of them have experienced similar problems and continue to struggle with them. For many it leads to days filled with procrastination or being down in the dumps and non productive more than usual.

I wish I could offer you a solution but I can’t. In my case I have been on Prozac (fluoxetine) for depression (never knowing what it felt like not to be mildly depressed for the first 42 years of my life) since 6 weeks before I was diagnosed with ADHD in 1996. The combination of Ritalin and Prozac have worked well in tandem for me and in addition to those two my doctor prescribed me Valium (Diazepam) to take occasionally for anxiety to be taken as needed. A 30 pill supply of 5 mg of diazepam usually last me about two months even though the prescription says I can take it every four hours as needed. Diazepam has caused me no side effects, does not make me tired or less alert and seems to quickly assist in relieving my anxiety when I get it.

Just because I take this combination of medications does not mean that you should. I am just sharing this information with you. to be taken as needed. A 30 pill supply of 5 mg of diazepam usually last me about two months even though the prescription says I can take it every four hours as needed. Diazepam has caused me no side effects, does not make me tired or less alert and seems to quickly assist in relieving my anxiety when I get it.

Just because I take this combination of medications does not mean that you should. I am just sharing this information with you. You would have to consult your own doctor on this matter as some people can become addicted to Valium (diazepam). This has not been a problem for me but we are all different and it should be a consideration for you.

While on the subject of addiction to medication I have been interviewed by the press recently and asked by others frequently about my long term use of Ritalin (methylphenidate). I have no doubt in my mind that I am not addicted to it. I have no cravings for it, I have to remind myself to take it and at the end of my monthly prescription I always have extra pills left over. If addicted I would over medicate and run out of my pills early and be asking my doctor for a new prescription early. My only apparent side affect to Ritalin is an increase in sweating after I take it. It does not cause an odor problem for me so I live with it.

Since my medication regimen has remained unchanged for 8 years and I plan on continuing it with it for my entire life I obviously think it works well for me. I have always wondered and continue to do so if some of the other long proven ADHD medications or newer medications might work better than what I am on. Perhaps these other medications would work better for me but I had such a good response to my current medication I am reluctant to try and change.

I wrote this newsletter this month about mood and anxieties to let others who experience these problems know they are not alone. Maybe someone can write in and let me know of success stories they have had in this area and I will pass them along.

I have always believed that improving ADHD symptoms is about 25% medication, 25% motivation and 50% education. My education is continuous and ongoing. I would recommend to all of you that your education continue too.

The mood and anxiety problems that I continue to occasionally have although rooted in mystery and probably mild in comparison to other peoples have lessened considerably since I learned of ADHD and started on medication 8 years ago at age 42. To that diagnosis and its spurring me on my journey of self discovery I will always be grateful.

If you have any comments feel free to e-mail me a -short note- (if possible). I have ADHD too so I know how difficult it is to write short notes. addcorridorcoach@aol.com

FIRST EVER Poster devoted to ADHD view at: http://www.addcorridorcoaching.com/poster.asp

If you know on anyone who might like this newsletter please forward it to them and tell them to go to my web site http://www.addcorridorcoaching.com and sign up.
Have a great month. Talk to you soon.

Patrick J. Hurley

Author's Bio: 

51 years old Diagnosed with ADHD at age 42, former deputy sheriff for 17 years, former adult probation officer for 5 years. Currently an ADHD coach in Cedar Rapids, Iowa