The theory test is created with two parts; the multiple choice part and the hazard perception part. If you pass one part and fail the other you'll fail your entire test, and you'll require taking both parts again. Once you have passed the theory test then you can apply for your practical driving test.

The theory test is included in of two parts:

1. The Multiple option questions part:

The multiple choice portion of the DSA test is designed to test your understanding of the theory associated with driving. The questions in each multiple choice test in DSA test change in respect to the category of vehicle you're looking to obtain a license for, i.e. a motorcycle driving test will consist of specific questions that do not appear in any other DSA test. A question and several answer options will look on screen and you have to choose a correct answer to the question by touching the screen. Some questions require more than one answer. You can navigate between questions and 'flag' questions that you want to come back to later in the test.

2. The Hazard perception test part:

This part of the DSA test designed to test your consciousness of potential hazards while driving. You'll be shown with a series of 14 video clips each one minute long, which feature every day route scenes. In each clip there'll be a minimum of one developing hazard and you need to click the mouse during the time you see a hazard developing. The videos have several types of hazard, such as road conditions, vehicles and pedestrians. The earlier you spot a hazard developing that may require the driver to take some action, the higher the score. There are 15 scaleable hazards in the tests and candidates can score up to 5 points on each hazard.

Hazard perception test is an interactive practice in the driving theory test featuring hazard perception clips to identify the developing potential hazards.

Reason to introduce hazard perception test element:

The government is dedicated to cutting down the numbers killed and badly wounded on Britain's roads by 40 per cent by 2010. The hazard perception component was introduced into the driving test in November 2002 as one of the measures that should help do this target by boosting accurate training in scanning the road, recognizing at the first chance from the clues that a potentially unsafe position might arise and adopting a driving plan to minimize the risk.

During the development of this test, the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) acted closely with co workers from the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) and the road safety region of the Department for Transport, both of whom thought this test desirable for testing the hazard.

When to respond to score in hazard perception test:

As an example, of how to spot and interact to a developing hazard, consider a parked vehicle on the side of the road. When you first watch it, it is not doing anything ; it is just a parked vehicle. If you were to respond to the vehicle at this point, you would not score any marks, but you would not lose any marks.

However, during the time you get nearer to the vehicle, you noticed that the car's right hand indicator starts to flash. The indicator would lead you to believe that the driver of the vehicle has an intention of moving away, hence the hazard is now developing and a reaction at this point would score marks. The indicator coming on is a sign that the parked vehicle has switched its status from a potential hazard into a developing hazard.

When you get closer to the vehicle, you will probably visualize the vehicle start to move away from the side of the road; another reaction should be made at this point. Different clips in the test will have various signs to indicate that the hazard is changed its status from a potential hazard into a developing hazard.

When you become closer to the vehicle, you are able watch the vehicle start to move away from the side of the road; another response should be made at this point. Different clips in the test will have various signs to indicate that the hazard is changing its status and is now starting to develop.

The scoring pattern in hazard perception test:

Each scoring window is divided into five equal sections and a score of five through to one assigned to each. Those reacting in the first section of the scoring window will score 5 and those in last segment a score of 1. Reactions outside the window will score zero.

Author's Bio: 

John Grath is involved with Driving test in writing useful driving theory test and motorbike theory test tips. You can learn more about driving test, driving test dvd, book driving theory test, driving test CD, DVD, hazard perception dvd, theory test download, theory test DVD online theory test information here.