Rose geranium essential oil has been a staple ingredient for perfumery and skin care for a very long time. Just like its regular counterpart, the rose oil, it is very useful for mature skin, because it moisturizes it and helps restore its elasticity. There are many benefits associated with the use of geranium oil, from reducing wrinkles to improving complexion color and texture, but its therapeutic properties go further than skin deep, quite literally, to revitalize muscle tone, improve hormonal balance and stimulate cell growth.

Geranium oil also provides relief for irritable or breakout prone skin. It acts as a gentle cleanser and mild antiseptic and its soothing fragrance calms both the body and the mind. Rose and rose geranium are frequently used together in skin care products to take advantage of their synergistic benefits.

The essential oil is, of course, obtained through steam distillation, which yields the highest concentration of active ingredients and requires specialized equipment to extract. If you would still like to make your own but don’t want to go to all that trouble, the infused oil is always an option, just pack the bruised leaves tightly in a jar, cover them with a good quality oil and leave them in a sunny window for a month, stirring and replacing the green matter every few days to get a higher concentration of active ingredients.

Keep in mind that the infused oil can’t match the potency of the one obtained through distillation, but it will be adequate as a massage or bath oil.

Author's Bio: 

Main Areas: Garden Writing; Sustainable Gardening; Homegrown Harvest
Published Books: “Terra Two”; “Generations”; "The Plant - A Steampunk Story"; "Letters to Lelia"; "Fair"; "Door Number Eight"; "A Year and A Day"; "Möbius' Code"
Career Focus: Author; Consummate Gardener;
Affiliation: All Year Garden; The Weekly Gardener; Francis Rosenfeld's Blog

I started blogging in 2010, to share the joy of growing all things green and the beauty of the garden through the seasons. Two garden blogs were born: allyeargarden.com and theweeklygardener.com, a periodical that followed it one year later. I wanted to assemble an informal compendium of the things I learned from my grandfather, wonderful books, educational websites, and my own experience, in the hope that other people might use it in their own gardening practice.