Skin disorders vary greatly in symptoms and severity. They can be temporary or permanent and may be painless or painful. Some have situational causes, while others may be genetic. Some skin conditions are minor, and others can be life-threatening.
While most skin disorders are minor, others can indicate a more serious issue. Contact your doctor if you think you might have one of these common skin problems.
Eczema—Also known as atopic dermatitis, this is a long-term skin disease. The most common symptoms are dry and itchy skin, rashes on the face, inside the elbows, behind the knees, and on the hands and feet. Hives—Red and sometimes itchy bumps on your skin. An allergic reaction to a drug or food usually causes them.

Acne
Acne is a skin disorder that causes pimples when the passageway that connects the skin’s pores to the oil glands becomes clogged.
Acne, which appears most often on the face, neck, shoulders, chest, and back, can come in many forms. Whiteheads and blackheads are the most commonly known; nodular and cystic acne is more severe because they form deep in the skin and can cause scars.
Eighty percent of Americans will have acne at some point in their lives, and 60 percent will continue to experience it into adulthood.

Factors like heredity can play a role in developing acne, but Alexiades-Armenakas said that hormones are the most important factor.
"In both men and women, the reason it peaks in the teenage years is that growth hormone is released at a very high frequency," Alexiades-Armenakas said. "Production really spikes and valleys in the course of a day, and this surging of the growth hormone is why acne is most severe in the teenage years."

Eczema
Eczema is a "grab-bag term," which Alexiades-Armenakas said comes from the Greek word for "boils over." There are three common forms of eczema:
— Atopic dermatitis is the most common and is seen most often in children. One to three percent of adults compared to 10 to 20 percent of children have this long-term genetic disease, which causes itchy rashes in the crux of the elbows and behind the knees.
— Allergic contact dermatitis begins to show in adulthood and is caused by environmental factors such as cosmetic agents, fragrances and the metals in jewelry.
— Nummular dermatitis looks like red and flaky coin-shaped patches of skin and is due to dry skin. This can be very itchy.
"In all cases, what you want to do is moisturize the skin, build up the skin barrier and avoid drying out the skin," Alexiades-Armenakas said. "And then, usually, we use corticosteroids for these conditions."

Rosacea
Rosacea is a chronic skin disease that affects more than 16 million Americans. The cause of rosacea is still unknown, and there is no cure. However, research has allowed doctors to find ways to treat the condition by minimizing their symptoms.
There are four subtypes of rosacea. Each subtype has its own set of symptoms. It is possible to have more than one subtype of rosacea at a time.
Rosacea’s trademark symptom is small, red, pus-filled bumps on the skin that are present during flare-ups. Typically, rosacea affects only skin on your nose, cheeks, and forehead.
Psoriasis
Psoriasis is a chronic and disfiguring genetic disease. It is a buildup of excess skin tissue that looks red and thick and is covered with silvery scales. It first appears on the elbows and knees but can spread to other parts of the limbs and even the trunk. Certain forms affect particular areas like the hands, scalp or the joints.
"Patients with psoriasis have a very poor quality of life because it’s very obvious and it makes the patient extraordinarily self-conscious," Alexiades-Armenakas said.

Although there are an array of skin conditions that can plague humans, treatment options for some, including acne, eczema, and dermatitis have improved. If you suspect you have any of these conditions, see a dermatologist immediately to evaluate your treatment options.

Cellulitis
Cellulitis is a common bacterial skin infection. Cellulitis may first appear as a red, swollen area that feels hot and tender to the touch. The redness and swelling often spread rapidly. Cellulitis is usually painful.

In most cases, the skin on your lower legs is affected, although the infection can occur anywhere on your body or face. Cellulitis usually affects the surface of your skin, but it may also affect the underlying tissues. Cellulitis can also spread to your lymph nodes and bloodstream.

If cellulitis isn’t treated, the infection might become life-threatening. You should get medical help right away if you experience the symptoms of cellulitis.

Melasma

Melasma is a common skin problem. The condition causes dark, discolored patches on your skin.
It’s also called chloasma, or the “mask of pregnancy,” when it occurs in pregnant women. The condition is much more common in women than men, though men can get it too. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, 90 percent of people who develop melasma are women.

Wart

Warts are raised bumps on your skin caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Warts have plagued humans for thousands of years — they have been discovered on 3,000-year-old mummies and were mentioned by Shakespeare. Although warts generally aren’t dangerous, they are ugly, potentially embarrassing, and contagious. They can also be painful.

What are the types of warts?

Common warts
Common warts usually grow on your fingers and toes but can appear elsewhere. They have a rough, grainy appearance and a rounded top. Common warts are grayer than the surrounding skin.

Plantar Warts

Plantar warts grow on the soles of the feet. Unlike other warts, plantar warts grow into your skin, not out of it. You can tell if you have a plantar wart if you notice what appears to be a small hole in the bottom of your foot that is surrounded by hardened skin. Plantar warts can make walking uncomfortable.

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