Old age brings about a number of diseases. One of them is rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that affects millions of people worldwide.

In RA, the body's connective tissue reacts sensitively to invading bacteria, changes in temperature or secretions made by the endocrine glands. Physical and emotional ...Old age brings about a number of diseases. One of them is rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that affects millions of people worldwide.

In RA, the body's connective tissue reacts sensitively to invading bacteria, changes in temperature or secretions made by the endocrine glands. Physical and emotional shock, fatigue, injury or even malnutrition may affect the person in such a way that he experiences pain and swelling of the joints accompanied by fever, chills, and other signs of infection.

These symptoms may appear gradually or suddenly and manifest themselves differently in various people. But when they do, they usually affect the knees and the fingers first, and spread to the shoulders, wrists, ankles, and elbows.

In severe cases, nearly every joint of the body comes under attack of the disease. The joints become inflamed and swollen and cause pain and stiffness that lasts for weeks, months or even years, especially if they are moved or involved in any action. Finally, the muscles and tendons waste away and cause deformities that often confine a person to a wheel-chair or in bed for life. This is the scourge of RA, a disease whose cure is as mysterious as its beginnings.

Although the disease manifests itself in the joints, it is a systemic disorder involving the whole body. Those who are lucky manage to live productively in spite of RA’s crippling effects. Drugs can reduce pain and help the patient cope with the condition. But RA is a stubborn disease and may recur from time to time even after an apparent cure. This is why early treatment and diagnosis are essential in alleviating its debilitating effects.

Persons with RA are usually underweight. Even if there is no crash diet for the disease, patients are advised to eat a well-balanced meal, particularly one rich in vegetables and fruits. Rest is especially important; more so in the presence of pain and in advanced stages. If not, exercise and other forms of physical therapy are essential for the patient's health. These will keep the muscles in shape and help reduce deformities.

In severe cases, the use of casts, splints, and other orthopedic devices may prove helpful in reducing deformities and making the patient comfortable. No matter how severe his or her condition is, the patient should never lose hope for there are many people who have learned to live productively with the disease.

Various drugs are effective in eliminating pain but these should not be taken without a doctor's prescription since many of them have serious side effects. To be on the safe side, take Flexcerin – a natural painkiller that won’t harm your health. Flexcerin helps reduce pain and inflammation and rebuilds and repairs damaged joints so you can do whatever you want to do. For details, visit http://tinyurl.com/8jkw6ma

Author's Bio: 

Janet Martin is an avid health and fitness enthusiast and published author. Many of her insightful articles can be found at the premiere online news magazine www.thearticleinsiders.com.