She only wanted to look like her idol. But a 43-year-old fan is now suffering after an anti-wrinkle product she used backfired and left her with an ugly face.

Lu Ping, a resident of eastern China's Jiangxi Province, is furious at Hong Kong film star Carina Lau for making her believe that SK-II ...She only wanted to look like her idol. But a 43-year-old fan is now suffering after an anti-wrinkle product she used backfired and left her with an ugly face.

Lu Ping, a resident of eastern China's Jiangxi Province, is furious at Hong Kong film star Carina Lau for making her believe that SK-II would make her look younger.

The Japanese cosmetics brand was endorsed by Lau in an advertisement that appeared in a fashion magazine. Lau claimed the product reduced wrinkles by 47 percent and made users appear 12 years younger.

Thinking SK-II would make her look like a movie star, Ping tried the product and hoped for the best. After all, aside from star endorsement, the product was also distributed by Procter and Gamble (PG) so what could go wrong?

But the unexpected happened and things got worse.

“She bought a bottle of skin-tightening, anti-wrinkle facial milk. But 28 days later, her skin had not become silky. Instead, she said her face became itchy and she felt a burning sensation,” reported ChinaDaily.com.

“She should pay for cheating customers with false advertising," said Ping who filed a lawsuit against Lau.

To add insult to injury, the product was removed from China shortly thereafter after local authorities found it contained toxic substances. Ironically, PG was fined only $25,000 for false advertising.

“China's General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine found chromium and neodymium in nine SK-II products, including the one Ping used,” said ChinaDaily.com.

“The toxic heavy metals can cause dermatitis and skin rashes. Neodymium also causes harm to eyes, lungs, and liver. They are banned for use in cosmetics in China,” it added.

Surprisingly, Lau maintains that the product is safe and continues to support the brand. Ping, on the other hand, said the actress should also be liable for the harm she has done.

"I wouldn't have bought it (the product) if she hadn't advertised it," Ping said.

To protect consumers, the State Administration of Industry and Commerce has banned medical and food advertisements that feature celebrities as patients, consumers, and experts.

To avoid Ping’s fate, carefully examine product labels and be skeptical of products that sound too good to be true. If you’re looking for an effective wrinkle remover, try Dermaxin. This powerful anti-aging cream nourishes and hydrates the skin to reduce fine lines and wrinkles, and other signs of aging. Check out http://tinyurl.com/8jkw6ma for more information.

Author's Bio: 

Janet Martin is an avid health and fitness enthusiast and published author. Many of her insightful articles can be found at the premiere online news magazine www.thearticleinsiders.com.