The growing problem of antibiotic resistance is sweeping the world, putting many people at risk of deadly respiratory tract infections (RTIs).

This was the consensus of medical experts at the 22nd International Congress of Chemotherapy in Amsterdam. The congress brought together nearly 3,000 ...The growing problem of antibiotic resistance is sweeping the world, putting many people at risk of deadly respiratory tract infections (RTIs).

This was the consensus of medical experts at the 22nd International Congress of Chemotherapy in Amsterdam. The congress brought together nearly 3,000 delegates from all over the world representing more than 60 member societies of the International Society of Chemotherapy.

During the symposium, new data were presented showing the alarming problem of antibacterial resistance in many parts of the world, owing largely to the uncontrolled and inappropriate use of antibiotics in both industrial and developing countries.

One of the speakers, Dr. Dieter Adam, professor of pediatrics at the Kinderklinik der Universitat Munchen in Munich, Germany, noted the high incidence of antibacterial resistance to two commonly prescribed antibiotics - penicillin and macrolides – in Hong Kong, France, Spain and Greece. He attributed the problem to the availability of antibiotics over the counter, wrong prescription practices, low-priced generic brands, and poor patient compliance.

Because of this, treatment of RTIs like pneumonia, tonsillitis and bronchitis has become difficult and a burden to many patients around the world. Dr. Robert Cohen, a pediatrician at the Department of Microbiology, Hospital Intercommunal de Creteil in France, added that RTIs account for more than 50 percent of consultations and more than 75 percent of antibiotic prescriptions.

In his report titled, “Infections of the airways” published in Current Opinion on Infectious Diseases. Dr. R. Wilson said new drugs are required to combat the growing menace of RTIs that affect millions of people worldwide – both young and old alike.

“Until recently, the antibiotics available for the management of RTIs were adequate and there was less of a need for new agents. However now that common pathogens are more likely to be resistant to currently prescribed antibiotics and new pathogens are being recognized, the situation has changed,” Wilson said.

In America alone, RTIs are among the Top 10 causes of death in the elderly and cost the nation more than $24 billion yearly. In Switzerland, RTIs account for almost 50 percent of pediatric consultations and over 3 million working days are lost because of the disease.

In addition to the continued loss of work and school days, RTIs weaken the body’s natural immune system, eventually leading to the deterioration of pulmonary function.

Another researcher, Dr. P. Bell, who said that there is a need for more judicious use of antibiotics, shares Wilson’s sentiments. He said that in the United Kingdom, over 25 million antibiotic prescriptions are given yearly but many of these are unnecessary and contribute mainly to antibiotic resistance.

“After 40 years of antibiotic use, it appears that other strategies will be necessary in the present decade to eradicate RTIs,” said Dr. J.M. Bernstein in Respiration.

A god diet and a healthy weight will help fight RTIs. To stay in shape, take Phenocal - a safe, natural, and effective weight loss supplement that boosts your metabolism, suppresses your appetite, reduces food cravings, and increases energy levels to keep you fit. Visit http://tinyurl.com/8jkw6ma for details.

Author's Bio: 

Janet Martin is an avid health and fitness enthusiast and published author. Many of her insightful articles can be found at the premiere online news magazine www.thearticleinsiders.com.