Ads for diet soft drinks show slender, beautiful women parading in skimpy bikinis, obviously to entice people to buy thee products and make them believe that they can control weight.

But these ads are deceiving since there is no evidence to support these claims, according to Kurt Butler and ...Ads for diet soft drinks show slender, beautiful women parading in skimpy bikinis, obviously to entice people to buy thee products and make them believe that they can control weight.

But these ads are deceiving since there is no evidence to support these claims, according to Kurt Butler and Dr. Lynne Rayner of the University of Hawaii in “The Best Medicine.”

Experts say that while diet drinks have little or no calories at all, they contain the artificial sweetener saccharin that may stimulate the appetite.

People who regularly take diet sodas can also suffer from calcium deficiency since these drinks contain caffeine and phosphoric acid that promote calcium excretion and damage teeth.

Phosphorus is normally needed by the body for strong bones and teeth and to break down carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. But the heavy consumption of diet drinks creates an oversupply of phosphorus. This, in turn, leads to the poor development of bones and teeth in children and brittle bones in adults.

Another problem concerns the safety of artificial sweeteners used in these products. Some diet drinks are sweetened with saccharin and aspartame.

Saccharin causes cancer in laboratory animals and only time and more tests will tell whether this is true for humans. But heavy smokers who drink saccharin-sweetened beverages may have a greater risk of contracting this deadly disease, said Drs. G. Timothy Johnson and Stephen Goldfinger of the Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Susan Baker of the Boston Children's Hospital reports that this controversial sweetener may interfere with blood sugar retention, posing a threat to those with diabetes. Because of this and other possible dangers, Rayner warns against the use of diet soft drinks by youngsters and pregnant women.

Although aspartame has been certified safe by the US Food and Drug Administration, it shouldn't be taken by those suffering from the enzyme deficiency phenylketonuria (PKU). This disorder is characterized by high levels of phenylalanine in the bloodstream that can cause brain damage.

For a safe diet drink, doctors recommend a popular, sugar-free, calorie-free, inexpensive brand -water. It is filling but not fattening. To stay in perfect shape, take Zylorin, the safe and natural way to lose weight. Combined with a good exercise and diet program, Zylorin will help you burn fat, speed up your metabolism, and control unhealthy food cravings. Visit http://tinyurl.com/8jkw6ma for more details.

Author's Bio: 

Janet Martin is an avid health and fitness enthusiast and published author. Many of her insightful articles can be found at the premiere online news magazine www.thearticleinsiders.com.