Are you being bullied by bursitis? Terrorized by tendonitis? Fear no more. It’s time to fight back!

Bursitis is the inflammation of the bursa, the saclike fluid filled structure that lubricates, cushions, and protects the joint.

The bursae of the elbow, shoulder, hip, knee or heel are ...Are you being bullied by bursitis? Terrorized by tendonitis? Fear no more. It’s time to fight back!

Bursitis is the inflammation of the bursa, the saclike fluid filled structure that lubricates, cushions, and protects the joint.

The bursae of the elbow, shoulder, hip, knee or heel are common sites of this disorder which affects both athletes and those who lead sedentary lives.

As the bursa becomes inflamed, calcium deposits accumulate and press on the nerve endings, causing extreme pain that immobilizes the affected area. Other symptoms are swelling and tenderness.

Bursitis may be caused by an injury to a joint, infection or unusual muscular effort. It may follow diseases like gout, rheumatoid arthritis, and syphilis. In most cases, its cause is unknown but this is not a serious problem and symptoms normally subside in seven to 14 days.

Treatment includes rest and applying ice packs or heat to the inflamed area. Persistent attacks may require the removal of the accumulated fluid or the use of corticosteroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Ask your doctor about these medications.

Tendinitis or tendonitis, on the other hand, is the inflammation of a tendon (the tissue that connects the muscle to a bone). If the tendon sheath (the tissue that surrounds a tendon) is involved, the condition is called tenosynovitis.

Like bursitis, the above conditions may be caused by injury from athletic activities, poor posture or musculo-skeletal disorders, including congenital defects and rheumatism. Common sites are the shoulder, elbow, and heel.

Both tendinitis and tenosynovitis are characterized by local tenderness and pain, swelling, restricted movement, and weakness in the tendon caused by calcium deposits in the area.

A tennis elbow (epicondylitis) is a form of tendinitis at the elbow caused by swinging or holding a tennis racket incorrectly. But it can occur in anyone as long as there is repeated and forcible straining of the wrist. This often occurs when you carry a heavy suitcase or in occupations that require strenuous forearm movement like mechanics and carpentry.

The areas involved are the elbow muscles, tendons, and epicondyle, a bony prominence on the outside of the elbow. where the muscles of the forearm attach to the bone of the upper arm. Symptoms are pain, tenderness, and a weak grip.

Like bursitis, treatment for tendinitis and tennis elbow include rest, hot or cold packs, and exercises to prevent stiffness and increase strength.

Many painkillers can relieve these conditions but they often have undesirable side effects. For quick relief without adverse reactions, use Flexcerin. This powerful supplement restores joint function and stops pain and swelling so you can live a normal life. Check out http://tinyurl.com/8jkw6ma for details.

Author's Bio: 

Janet Martin is an avid health and fitness enthusiast and published author. Many of her insightful articles can be found at the premiere online news magazine www.thearticleinsiders.com.