Getting a job can be difficult, especially if you have arthritis.

This was revealed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) after analyzing the results of its first countrywide survey on the impact of arthritis on work. The study involved over 200,000 American adults. ...Getting a job can be difficult, especially if you have arthritis.

This was revealed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) after analyzing the results of its first countrywide survey on the impact of arthritis on work. The study involved over 200,000 American adults.

Arthritis is a disease characterized by the inflammation of the joints that affects an estimated 46 million people in the United States alone. It is the nation’s leading cause of disability that causes pain, swelling, and stiffness of the joints. Because of the disease, the CDC said nearly 12 percent of Americans aged 45 to 64 face work limitations.

“Countrywide, 6.7 percent of people ages 18 to 64, including 11.7 percent of those 45 to 64, reported that they either could not work at all or were limited in the amount and type of work they could perform due to arthritis in its various forms. A third of working-age people who reported having arthritis said they suffered work limitations,” according to Reuters.

Among the states, Kentucky was the worst affected with 15 percent of workers saying that arthritis interfered with their work. The least affected was Hawaii with only 3.4 percent reporting work limitations.

In all states, unemployment was higher among people who had arthritis. Nearly 19 million adults claim they have limited activities because of the disease.

“These findings show that large numbers of workers in every state are affected by arthritis," said Janet Collins, director of the CDC's National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

"With the increasing number of older Americans in the nation's work force, it is important that employers, health departments, and others take steps that help people with arthritis stay employed or become employed," she added.

In 2003, the medical costs for arthritis and other rheumatic conditions were $81 billion, according to the CDC. All in all, the cost attributed to arthritis was $128 billion up from $86.2 billion in 1997.

To prevent complications and live a normal life, seek medical advice at the first sign of arthritis. Don’t ignore the disease to avoid regrets later. When arthritis strikes, strike back with Flexcerin. This powerful supplement soothes aching joints and restores joint function without the harmful side effects of other prescription painkillers. Check out http://tinyurl.com/8jkw6ma for details.

Author's Bio: 

Janet Martin is an avid health and fitness enthusiast and published author. Many of her insightful articles can be found at the premiere online news magazine www.thearticleinsiders.com.