Advances in dentistry have made it easier to care for one’s teeth. With a plethora of products in the market today backed by good dental services and conscientious oral hygiene, there should be no reason for people to suffer from tooth decay or lose teeth.

Ironically, despite the presence ...Advances in dentistry have made it easier to care for one’s teeth. With a plethora of products in the market today backed by good dental services and conscientious oral hygiene, there should be no reason for people to suffer from tooth decay or lose teeth.

Ironically, despite the presence of readily available information about the prevention and treatment of dental disease, a lot of myths and misconceptions remain. As a public service to readers, here are some of the more common tooth myths and the surprising truth behind them.

Healthy teeth are white. False. Although TV commercials may make you believe so, the truth is only mannequins have white teeth. In reality, the natural color of teeth is yellowish, ranging from gray-yellow to light reddish-yellow. This is true for all races.

Apples and other crunchy foods are good for teeth. False. Apples and other crunchy foods are mistakenly referred to as “detergent foods” or “nature’s toothbrush” since they supposedly scrub away food particles and help clean teeth. While chomping on an apple is definitely healthier for your teeth than eating sticky sweets, it is no substitute for regular flossing and brushing. Studies have shown that the “exercise” provided by chewing on coarse foods like apples is not enough to clean critical areas of the teeth where decay may begin.

Some people have soft teeth, making them susceptible to cavities. False. Tooth decay or caries is caused by a variety of factors such as bacteria, acids, dental plaque, food residue, thick, heavy saliva, and on many occasions, poor oral hygiene. While some mouths are more prone to decay than others owing to these factors, it is wrong to say that decay-prone individuals have “soft teeth.” The truth is, all teeth are very hard. Tooth enamel is harder than iron, gold and porcelain.

While good dental health is easy to achieve, many people don’t brush or floss properly, making them susceptible to tooth decay or caries and gum disease. Bad teeth can make you look old and ugly and can prevent you from enjoying your favorite foods. Since good teeth are essential to health and can make you look younger, visit a dentist regularly to stop problems before they get worse.

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Author's Bio: 

Janet Martin is an avid health and fitness enthusiast and published author. Many of her insightful articles can be found at the premiere online news magazine www.thearticleinsiders.com