If you cross your eyes often, will you become cross-eyed? Is it bad to read in dim light? Will sitting close to the TV set harm your eyes?

Many people will probably answer those questions with a resounding “yes” but the facts say otherwise. So join me as we uncover the truths about ...If you cross your eyes often, will you become cross-eyed? Is it bad to read in dim light? Will sitting close to the TV set harm your eyes?

Many people will probably answer those questions with a resounding “yes” but the facts say otherwise. So join me as we uncover the truths about these persistent eye myths courtesy of Eyevive, a potent cream that eliminates dark circles, puffiness, eye bags, and other signs of aging. Check out http://tinyurl.com/8jkw6ma for more information.

If you keep your eyes crossed from time to time to entertain your kids and guests, will you eventually end up cross-eyed? That’s what others believe but that can only happen in your dreams. Dr. Eugene R. Folk, former co-director of the Pediatric Ophthalmology Clinic at the University of Illinois, said people who cross their eyes won’t damage their eyes.

Cross-eyes or strabismus is usually congenital (present at birth) or may be due to eye injuries. Either way, the tiny muscles that control eye movement are affected and one of the eyes becomes misaligned.

The problem is corrected by prescription glasses or contact lenses. Eye exercises may help in simple cases but more severe forms require surgery.

Will reading in dim light harm your eyes? Of course not! This is another myth that refuses to die. Contrary to popular belief, reading in the dark, in a moving car or in bed won’t damage your eyes. Folk said the worse you can expect is a nasty headache or nausea. This comes from strained muscles which have to work harder since you’re reading in an awkward position.

“People who read in bed generally do so in positions which demand an almost impossible adjustment not from the eye or its lens but from the muscles which govern its movement. When these muscles are strained, they ache just like any other muscle. Sit up straight in bed or in an ordinary chair, and there will be no strain on the muscles and no ache,” explained Carol Ann Rinzler in “The Dictionary of Medical Folklore.”

How many times has your mom told you not to sit close to the TV set to avoid ruining your eyes? And how many times have you been told not to watch TV in the dark?

It’s time to put those myths to rest. Dr. Theodore Lawwill of the American Academy of Ophthalmology said TV won’t do any lasting harm to your eyes even if you sit close to it. Kids, he said, like to be as close to the set as possible but nothing bad will come out of this habit. That’s because their eyes can easily adjust whether the object is far or two inches or less away from them.

Should you worry if the room is too dark? Not really. In fact, people with mild cataracts may even see better in dim light. But this can cause eyestrain. To remedy this, simply adjust the set to get a better picture.

“The contrast between a bright set and a dark room temporarily tires some people’s eyes as does the reflective glare off the screen from a poorly placed lamp, but neither situation will lead to long-term damage,” said Deborah Franklin in “Health” magazine.

Author's Bio: 

Janet Martin is an avid health and fitness enthusiast and published author. Many of her insightful articles can be found at the premiere online news magazine www.thearticleinsiders.com.