So¡Kyou are now the proud parents of your beautiful baby but how much do you know about looking after him or her? Having a baby can be the most joyous event in your life but it can also be the most intimidating. There is no instruction book and it is therefore important that you know about some of the things that lie ahead. With a basic understanding, the job ahead will be much easier.

ľ Caesarean delivery: A caesarean is normally carried out on women when there is a possible danger in normal delivery. C-sections can be performed for many different reasons including delayed labour, difficult labour, problems with the baby that may make delivery hard, or other problems. Just remember, you are still a mother with a beautiful new blessing whether the baby is born vaginally or by a caesarean section.

ľ Bathing your baby: While your baby still has her umbilical cord, she should only be sponge bathed. The umbilical cord generally falls off after a week or two. After this happens, bath your baby in a shallow baby bath as shown by your nurse.

ľ Circumcision: Circumcision, though once widely accepted as almost routine, has become controversial in the past couple of decades. Many doctors concur that there are benefits to being circumcised as it may help to lower the risk of urinary tract infections and eliminates almost any chance of penile cancer. Circumcision does not cause long-term emotional problems for your child.

ľ Crib death (SIDS): Many studies have been done regarding SIDS. Although the cause of SIDS has not been definitely defined, there are some correlations that have been made between SIDS and the following things:

o Male babies are more likely to die from SIDS than females
o Prematurity makes it more likely
o Minority children are affected by it more often than non-minorities
o Children who live in a home with one or more smokers are more likely to be affected

Some people say that sleeping with your baby can reduce the risk of SIDS, but the American Academy of Pediatrics disagree with this statement and go on to say that there is a greater risk of SIDS in babies who co-sleep.

ľ Diapers: Most babies need a diaper change at each feeding time. This means that your baby will need about 6-8 diapers a day or more.

ľ Diaper rash: Sensitive skin is a common problem for some babies and they may get a diaper rash due to a food allergy, yeast infection, sitting too long in a wet or messy diaper, or teething. If you notice your baby beginning to get a diaper rash, talk to your pediatrician about which diaper rash medicine will work for your baby.

ƒæ Growth spurts: If you begin to notice that your child is not as satisfied with the amount that you have been feeding her previously, then she may be beginning a growth spurt period. Growth spurts can start as early as 10 days after your baby¡¦s birth. They are usually preceded by a sleepy, lethargic day and a big jump in appetite. Growth spurts may happen again at 3, 6, and 12 weeks and again at 4 and 6 months. If you are breastfeeding, you may want to add a feeding or two to satisfy your baby¡¦s appetite and to help increase milk production.

ľ Immunizations: With all of the conflicting reports on immunizations, you may be unsure about whether or not you want your child to receive immunizations. I think that there are simply too many fatal diseases that can be prevented by immunizing your baby to take the chance. If you are unsure, then you need to talk with your paediatrician, but understand that the reason that the infant mortality rate is so low in this country is because immunizations are routinely done.

ƒæ Pacifiers & thumb sucking: If you breastfeed, do not allow your child to use you as their pacifier. If your baby seems to have a need to suck beyond eating, then you need to give them a pacifier. There is no ¡§nipple confusion¡¨ between a breast nipple and a pacifier as they are very different in feel and taste. Babies will know the difference between the two. Some children do not want a pacifier but will suck on their thumb. If you don¡¦t have a problem with it, then let them.

ƒæ Spitting up: It is very common for babies to spit up, but some babies do it more than others. If your baby is growing normally, then there is no need to worry about it. Projectile throwing up is not the same as spitting up. Projectile throwing up is a violent reaction to reject the contents of the stomach and not just ¡§burping¡¨ up a little milk. If your baby does this frequently, consult your paediatrician.

Anne Wolski has worked in the health and welfare industry for more than 30 years. She is the owner of http://www.mummansun.com, a discount retail outlet, and a co-director of http://www.betterhealthshoppe.com which is an information portal with many interesting medical articles. She is also an associate of http://www.timzbiz.com which features many articles on internet marketing and resources.

Author's Bio: 

Anne Wolski has worked in the health and welfare industry for more than 30 years. She is the owner of http://www.mummansun.com, a discount retail outlet, and a co-director of http://www.betterhealthshoppe.com which is an information portal with many interesting medical articles. She is also an associate of http://www.timzbiz.com which features many articles on internet marketing and resources.