With the growing popularity of competitive gaming, some have questioned the legitimacy of e-sports. Many people, including athletes and late-night talk show hosts, have questioned whether a term that includes the word "sport" can really be used to describe something like video games. Is it fair to consider someone sitting at a computer or game console all day as an athlete? While most players probably agree that someone who plays a game like Halo or Call of Duty professionally is not an athlete in the same way that someone who plays in the NFL is an athlete, but is it really that different?

On the surface, you could argue that the two are not close to being alike. Athletes in traditional sports have honed their skills since childhood and have spent many hours working in the best possible physical shape. They spend hours each week studying their future opponent's style of play and keeping an eye out for any weakness that might give them an advantage. They have struggled through the minor leagues in their particular sport to be considered one of the best. Not just anyone can pick up a football, baseball, basketball, etc. And become a professional, there is a lot of hard work, dedication and sacrifice that goes into reaching that level. However, many of these things can also be said for professional players. Many gamblers claim to have played video games since they were young children, and most began pursuing the competitive side of gaming in their early teens. They spend hours learning every aspect of their favorite games, learning things like secret jumps, nade points and different angles to cut. They also review movies and watch streams of other players and teams to see what they are doing in specific scenarios so they can be better equipped to counter this strategy. They have worked their way up from teams that often consist of neighborhood friends or people they have met by playing online, to better teams in the hope that they will be noticed by one of the best players and get the chance to prove themselves. self. While millions of people around the world play video games in a certain capacity, only a small percentage of them have the talent and dedication required to be considered professional.

But traditional sports require teamwork. Athletes must work together to achieve a common goal. Apart from a few single-player esports titles, most games played at a competitive level are team-based. Call of Duty, Halo, Counter Strike, League of Legends, Dota, Overwatch, etc. All played by teams of at least four players. In many esports, teams are made up of players who can fill a given role. Just like in a sport like football, where you have some players whose jobs are to receive while others are responsible for blocking the quarterback, many team-based video games have similar roles. For example, in a game like Halo, you may have a player whose primary role is to go after the target, while another player may be most focused on getting killed. Just like in traditional sports, although a player may have a primary role, the best players are able to fill the role that is needed. This is similar to a football player who primarily plays defense, but should also be able to catch and run the ball if given the opportunity for an interception. As with other sports, being a good team player is one of the greatest qualities a player can have. It does not really matter how good a player's shot is if they are unable to communicate to their teammates what they see, or help force players to spawn in a particular place to catch a flag. How a person plays as part of a team can create or break their career, https://www.168esport.com/.

Author's Bio: 

With the growing popularity of competitive gaming, some have questioned the legitimacy of e-sports. Many people, including athletes and late-night talk show hosts, have questioned whether a term that includes the word "sport" can really be used to describe something like video games. Is it fair to consider someone sitting at a computer or game console all day as an athlete? While most players probably agree that someone who plays a game like Halo or Call of Duty professionally is not an athlete in the same way that someone who plays in the NFL is an athlete, but is it really that different?