Hypothyroidism in principle is actually a simple-to-understand disease. It of course involves the thyroid gland that becomes diseased and begins to become low-acting ("Hypothyroidism"). This is why a little catch-phrase can make it simple to remember when you've been diagnosed with the disease, by saying "hy-po, means low". The opposite acting thyroid disease is hyperthyroidism but this one, which causes an overactive thyroid gland, has a name that in itself says what is going on due to it; hyper-activity.

With hypothyroidism, the gland usually becomes diseased due to autoimmunity, meaning immune cells within the body will recognize the gland as an invader, as it would a virus or illness-causing bacteria (Hashimoto's thyroiditis). It will then destroy proteins the gland is largely made up of called "thyroglobulin" and "thyroid peroxidase". From these main proteins are manufactured what are called the T4 (thyroxine) and T3 (trio thyronine). A master gland in the brain called the "pituitary", is what sets the amount of these two hormones that the body runs-on for proper metabolism.

Metabolism is the rate at which the body burns all fuels coming into it daily. This includes food, water and oxygen. When a person feels unusually slowed down (low-energy), with feeling hyper being a sign of the opposite hormone imbalance, discussed earlier (hyperthyroidism), they need to see a licensed medical practitioner. Since this article is regarding hypothyroidism, symptoms to watch for are constipation, low bodily energy, depression, an unusual increase in hair loss and a slowed heart beat. Blood tests will be administered to see if you have an underactive thyroid or are entering early stages of hypothyroidism. If the disease is found, antibodies to thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase would likely follow to see if it is occurring due to the most common cause - Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

The usual simple remedy for hypothyroidism, is a prescribed drug or drugs that will place the thyroid hormones back into their normal values/levels.

Author's Bio: 

In late 2002 - early 2003, I experienced a severe illness. I was first diagnosed with autoimmune thyroid disease and co-morbid Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Fibromyalgia. My son was already on his own when this occurred but my daughter was still finishing school, with plans for college. She now has a Bachelors in Sociology. My illness worsened in spite of treatment for 'the thyroid disease aspect of it' and it was manifesting like a neurological disease. My employment at the time, required considerable commuting-driving and I eventually reached a point that my legs and feet were not working well enough to drive more than short distances. All of this is detailed in my health subject books.

I worked for 8 years after the illness onset, all the while getting repeat MRIs, ultrasounds, heart tests, spinal taps, etc... A neurologist eventually recommended "vitamin E" blood testing and I had less than a half-point in my body ("0.4"). It was because of my neuro-pain and muscle weakness, etc.... that he decided on that particular test. Hole punch biopsies and nerve conduction studies already showed large and small fiber peripheral neuropathies.

I wrote and published books for each of the medical conditions I have experienced, including asthma/non-smoker COPD, NAFLD, plus for other related health conditions