Nothing is an invigorating as a nice, refreshing shower, but men with a penis rash may be surprised to find out that their showers may be making the rash worse. People with sensitive skin who use harsh soaps often make dermatological issues worse, even as they think that the washing they are doing should be making it better. Learning how to keep the equipment clean while avoiding soap-induced irritation can improve penis care issues and result in a more appealing, less itchy member. To do this, men may need to consider a soapless cleanser as an option.

So what's the deal with soap?

Why is soap not always a good match for sensitive skin? Why does it sometimes make that penis rash flare up?

Soap is basically a combination of fats, oils and salt; some soaps also include numerous other ingredients, such as fragrances. Those that are less "pure" - i.e., have added ingredients - are more likely to cause irritation, simply because the more ingredients there are, the more likely that one of them can cause a reaction. This is especially true of the added fragrances.

But even pure soaps can cause a reaction in the penile skin and other parts of the body. The fatty acids in soap can dry out the skin, and the high pH content of traditional soaps also damages the outer layer of skin and allows chemicals to have easier access to the inner layers.

You may already be using soapless cleansers on your penis.

Soapless cleanser are technically known as detergents or as surfactants, but those words aren't used often in promoting the products: detergent brings to mind images of gritty, powdery laundry soaps, which doesn't sound appealing, and surfactant doesn't convey the idea of cleaning.

So you may already be using a soapless cleanser without realizing it. Many products labeled "bath wash" or "beauty bar" may be soapless.

Why are some soapless cleansers better?

Every product is different, but most soapless cleansers are better for sensitive penis skin than many soaps. Primarily, this is because they tend to omit fats and replace them with more oils, which can help to moisturize the skin more. They help add water rather than dry out the skin. In addition, because they are non-alkaline, they don't leave a thin layer of soap residue on the body.

Now, too much oil is bad, but detergents with oils actually tend to address this issue: they dispose of the dirt-filled oil on the skin and replace it with fresh oils that are needed for skin health.

What to look for

When choosing a soapless cleanser, look for one that contains a high degree of moisturizing oils; is fragrance-free; and as much as possible is made from natural ingredients. The reason for the last requirement is that most skins react better to natural ingredients than manmade ingredients.

However, there are some people for whom certain natural ingredients do cause a reaction; just as some people cannot eat peanuts or strawberries, so do some people have such sensitive that select natural ingredients cause a reaction.

Unfortunately, it's hard to know exactly what your skin reacts to without a lot of trial and error. The best advice is to pick a cleanser and try it; if your skin behaves favorably toward it, keep using it. If it develops redness, soreness or itching, stop using it and try another option.

Penis rash isn't fun; even when it's not itchy and painful, it can be unattractive and off-putting to potential partners. In addition to using the proper cleanser, proper care of penile rashes must include an exceptional penis health formula (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil). Those that will help the most are those which can buttress the moisturizing activities of a good cleanser through the inclusion of vitamin E and a superior emollient such as shea butter. In addition, a formula with alpha lipoic acid will help prevent unwanted penis wrinkles.

Author's Bio: 

Visit www.man1health.com for more information about treating common penis health problems, including soreness, redness and loss of penis sensation. John Dugan is a professional writer who specializes in men's health issues and is an ongoing contributing writer to numerous online web sites.