When it comes to dental treatments, patients often wonder which one is more affordable in the long run – a root canal or an extraction. The answer to this question can vary depending on several factors, including the patient's dental health, the severity of the problem, and the cost of the procedure. In this blog post, we'll compare the root canal cost vs. extraction cost and help you make an informed decision.

Root Canal Cost
A root canal is a dental treatment that is used to save a tooth that has become infected or inflamed. During a root canal, the endodontist will remove the infected or inflamed pulp from the tooth's root canal, clean and disinfect the area, and then fill it with a dental filling. The procedure is usually performed under local anesthesia and takes about 1-2 hours to complete.

The cost of a root canal can vary depending on several factors, including the tooth's location, the extent of the damage, and the complexity of the procedure. In general, a root canal can cost anywhere from $500 to $1,500 per tooth.

Extraction Cost
An extraction, on the other hand, is a dental procedure that involves removing a tooth from the socket. This treatment is typically recommended when a tooth is too damaged or decayed to be saved or when it's causing problems for other teeth. The procedure is usually performed under local anesthesia and takes about 30 minutes to complete.

The cost of a tooth extraction can also vary depending on several factors, including the location of the tooth, the complexity of the procedure, and whether or not sedation is required. In general, a tooth extraction can cost anywhere from $75 to $900 per tooth.

Which One is More Affordable?
In the short term, tooth extraction may seem like the more affordable option since it's generally less expensive than a root canal. However, in the long run, a root canal can be more cost-effective since it allows you to save your natural tooth, which can prevent other dental problems from developing.

When you have a tooth extracted, the adjacent teeth can shift out of place, leading to bite problems, jaw pain, and even further tooth loss. In addition, when you lose a tooth, you'll need to replace it with a dental implant, bridge, or denture, which can be costly and time-consuming.

Conclusion
In the end, the decision to choose a root canal or extraction should be based on your dental health, the severity of the problem, and your budget. While a root canal may be more expensive upfront, it can be more affordable in the long run since it can prevent future dental problems and the need for tooth replacement.

If you're unsure which option is right for you, speak with an endodontist or dentist who can evaluate your dental health and provide you with personalized treatment recommendations. Remember, taking care of your dental health now can save you time, money, and discomfort in the long run.

Author's Bio: 

Max enjoys staying on top of the latest health trends and seeing how using more of a holistic approach is better for solving the problem. Weighing the difference between extraction cost and a root canal cost can be tedious.