There is a significant lack of consumer knowledge and communication about palliative and palliative care. After all, what doctor wants to tell a patient that he's dying? This conversation can be seen as an admission of failure rather than an act of kindness telling someone that it is okay to stop all exhausting, disgusting and painful treatments in favor of being more comfortable and relatively pain free. No one wanted to tell my father-in-law that he was dying after long months of chemotherapy and radiation. In fact, no one would admit reality until I forced my mother-in-law to ask for a given forecast just five days before her death. She had been questioning palliative care for months; No one wanted to discuss it. In my opinion, the months lost in pain could have been relatively painless months with a better quality of life.

According to the research, although Americans live longer, they also take longer to die. In addition, 3 out of 4 Americans are not afraid of death as much as they fear feeling pain at the time of death. However, many Americans do not experience a good death and few die at home. (1) A report from the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (2006) documented that less than 30% of all Medicare deceased, regardless of where they died, received an adequate amount of pain treatment. Similarly, less than 20% of people between the ages of 65 and 74 who died in hospitals received palliative care and pain management consultations. (two)

In reading this, one would be led to believe that the health care community is doing nothing when in reality; Some communities go overboard to compensate. Let's take a look at another example. The mother of a client was admitted to a local hospital to treat pneumonia. Before their personal cardiologist and pulmonologist could consult, the hospital's palliative care team rushed to speak to the family. They recommended taking away oxygen, antibiotics, and nutrition from the mother, and only taking comfort measures that would certainly lead to death.

When the cardiologist and pulmonologist arrived at the scene several hours later, the fireworks began. Mom's doctors punished the palliative care team for prematurely putting a woman in her grave long before her time and for unnecessarily scaring the family. The palliative care team used the defense that there was a notation in the woman's living will that she did not want to live unless she could regain 75% of function. While there is no way to predict a recovery in function, in this case, family members who knew their mother was a fighter and were in perfect physical health before pneumonia were ignored by the palliative care team.

Believe it or not, both cases are similar. Similar in the fact that family members who lacked knowledge and left decisions to doctors they saw as acquaintances, resulted in heartbreaking and almost tragic results. I wish these examples were limited to palliative and palliative care only. The fact is, distressing situations like these are prevalent in healthcare.

My advice to families is to listen to the doctors, but also to talk about the individual preferences and abilities of the person under consideration; The most important thing is to question the recommendations and seek the self-interest of those who make the recommendations. A family member with leukemia continued for months on an experimental treatment program promoted by her doctor when she might have had a different experience during the last months of her life. Everyone in the family assumed that this person wanted to continue the program so that she could make a difference in future lives; However, no one really asked, http://faithandhopehospice.com/.

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When the cardiologist and pulmonologist arrived at the scene several hours later, the fireworks began. Mom's doctors punished the palliative care team for prematurely putting a woman in her grave long before her time and for unnecessarily scaring the family.