Over the past half century, the dress shirt went from being an undergarment to being featured prominently in many outfits. This is one of the reasons why it is available today in so many styles, colors and patterns. Whether the style is Chinese or suit and tie, shirts are an essential means of expanding the wardrobe.

The style of a shirt indicates a lot about the intentions of the user. A button-down collar dress shirt, left chest pocket, plain front and single-button cuffs indicates leisure, while a dress shirt with a folded down collar, no chest pocket, front with placket and cuffs French indicates formality. The beauty of adjusting the style of a shirt is that you can design it not only for the occasion, but also to complement your unique characteristics.

Shirt collar

The collar of the men's dress shirt is the most important style detail, both to determine the level of formality of the garment and to flatter the user's face. Button collars are the least formal and extremely versatile; They look great without a tie, but can also be compatible with a tie and sweater, jacket or sports coat combination. The wing collar, on the other hand, is reserved for formal use and should always be worn with its accompanying parts. It is the least versatile necklace, whose sole purpose is to signal the highest level of clothing.

Most men's dress shirts have a kind of pointed collar, but there's plenty of room for variety here. While the standard point collar looks good on most men, those with narrower faces do better with slightly shorter ones, while round faces carry well above long neck points. As a general rule, the greater the angle between the short sides of the collar points, the more formal the presentation will be. Extended collars, which leave a wide opening between them, take large tie knots especially well. The edges of the trimmed collar almost form a straight line over the knot; This is the most formal necklace arrangement. An exception to the parallelism of extension and formality is the eyelash collar: Here little fabric tabs that extend from each side connect behind the tie knot, keep the necklace very close and project the knot out for a precise look and meaningless. The contrast white collar, in any style, with or without matching white French cuffs, is a favorite of power-dressers. While he certainly raises a suit and tie above the masses, the wearer should be warned if he cannot match his eminence.

In most decent dress shirts, the collar points are kept straight by the straps. These 2 to 3-inch pointed splints are inserted into the grooves at the bottom of the collar after ironing, and then removed for washing. In addition to the plastics that come with most shirts, you can buy them in brass, silver, and even ivory, but their material has a negligible effect on their function.

Shirt cuffs

Barrel cuffs, standard on most dress shirts, come in a variety of styles and, except for the most formal occasions, are never a bad choice. The common variety has a single button; Two or even three button cuffs are a bit more ingenious. The French cuffs are de rigueur for formal use; They look good in a suit but are always optional. A button on the sleeve placket helps keep the sleeve closed during use and can be opened to iron the cuffs; it is optional but almost ubiquitous.

Shirt pockets

The traditional left chest pocket adds a bit of depth to a dress shirt, especially when worn without a jacket and tie, and can be useful for holding pens, tickets, and the like. A shirt without pockets can look a bit cleaner with a coat and tie, but since the coat covers the pocket, the difference is minimal when wearing a suit. As with most things, simplicity equals formality, making the pocketless shirt the most elegant. https://societal.store/

Author's Bio: 

Over the past half century, the dress shirt went from being an undergarment to being featured prominently in many outfits. This is one of the reasons why it is available today in so many styles, colors and patterns. Whether the style is Chinese or suit and tie, shirts are an essential means of expanding the wardrobe.