More than once people have asked me "How do you have fun?" Sometimes I do not know if it is a compliment or a complaint. It has always been a question I have considered because "fun" is not a major in college, we do not study and get our degree in fun.

I really did not understand what became fun for many years. The jury is still out, whether I do or not. I think I have "paid my dues" even though I have learned what is fun and what is not. And there is as much science as there is art.

Now I keep my ears open. I listen to not only humor, but the rhythm of how it is delivered. I see people's reactions to other people's humor. I take notes. I can see that cards are cute.

Shakespeare instinctively knew so many years ago that "Brevity is the soul of wit". Even then, he had insight into knowing that people's attention span is short. Sure, they want to hear your joke or funny story, but they also have other things in mind. Although they think something is funny if it is long lasting and takes up too much of their time, they may consider you "funny", but chances are they will not come back for more of your humor.

Consider the cartoonist and comedian. That would be me. I created a single panel comic called London's Times Cartoons in 1997. I based it on the Shakesperian theory that humor was and is the humor of the soul. No long drawn caption. Sometimes no captions at all. The picture tells the story. It was an experiment. It was outside the wall. That year, I posted less than a hundred cartoons on my website. Although I had thought of many others, it was they who passed the litany test of "what's fun" for me.

So now I have one of the most visited comic pages on the Internet, 8.9 million visitors since January 2005, when we first started counting. It all happened so fast, it seemed like it would be hard for me to describe how it all happened. But I'm trying.

I'm sure there's more than just one way to make something similar happen. In my case, it was mainly listening to other people that I felt were funny, reading autobiographies of funny people, and studying humor. I saw sitcoms. I went to funny movies. I noticed that a liners in real life really was not much different than a liners in a cartoon.

They got my attention. They were of value. They were something I could repeat to my friends and they would enjoy it.

Another element of "being funny" at least in the market is finding one's niche or voice. Sometimes it can take time. A lot of time. In my case, I tried stand-up comedy, plays, and other such venues for a number of years. The problem was that I did not understand art well and was not able to perfect it to the degree I wanted.

So I tried writing, and eventually I decided to draw. I had read the autobiography of the late great Charles Schulz, in which he said that the reason he went into comics was because he could not do much else very well. That was the story of my life. If this is your story, it's never too late to develop your sense of humor. Listen, read, learn, and have a leap of faith ... and oh, and do not be afraid to look foolish. They might just be laughing at you yet, https://movieunstop.com/%e0%b8%ab%e0%b8%99%e0%b8%b1%e0%b8%87%e0%b9%84%e0....

Author's Bio: 

Now I keep my ears open. I listen to not only humor, but the rhythm of how it is delivered. I see people's reactions to other people's humor. I take notes. I can see that cards are cute.